Tag: Ipswich lawyer

How do you rate a collaborative divorce?

Television networks have the Nielson’s. Attorneys have Martingale-Hubbard and Avvo. Couples going through a collaborative divorce, however, act as their own rating service during the course of the proceeding and grades are based on whether or not both parties’ objectives/goals are being met. Confused? Let’s take a step back. At the first meeting of a… Read more »

Who gets the debt?

Opening discussions in any mediation or collaborative divorce typically center on topics like the children, the house, the savings account, retirement funds, etc. Very few include things like the amount of debt accrued within the marriage. Perhaps it should. Whether it’s mediation or a collaborative divorce, the most common types of debt I encounter are:… Read more »

5 common missteps in mediation

In mediation, there’s an overall assumption that both parties are reasonable and are willing to work together to reach an agreement. In addition, it is not uncommon for at least one of the spouses to be anxious to get through the mediation in order to put the divorce behind him or her. This can sometimes… Read more »

Is there a better time of year to get divorced?

To listen to some radio advertisements, getting a divorce can be just as much a New Year’s resolution as joining a gym, giving up sweets or any other goal for 2015. While it’s true that many people pondering a divorce towards the end of the year will wait until after the holidays to begin proceedings,… Read more »

A holiday time share—a good or bad idea?

Even for divorcing couples who get along and are working towards an amiable resolution, holiday visitation can be a contentious point of discussion. And unless you have been divorced before, questions are many: where for Thanksgiving? Where will the kids be on Christmas morning to open up presents from Santa? What are appropriate arrangements for… Read more »

Mediation: an opportunity for sharing

There are many reasons why divorcing couples choose mediation over collaborative divorce and litigation. Time and money rank tops among those reasons. These are the same reasons  why many couples divorcing via mediation are not inclined to hire experts as part of their divorce process.  While this can be okay in some cases, in others,… Read more »

Retirement savings are a collaborative effort, even in divorce

Whether you are divorcing via litigation, mediation or collaborative divorce, you need to divorce yourself from this thought: Your retirement savings are not a marital asset. Truth be told, your retirement savings are a marital asset—just like your home, bank accounts, etc.–and will be part of any divorce settlement you and your spouse strike. In… Read more »

Alimony in mediation and collaborative divorce

When you hear the term “alimony”, there’s a tendency to think there’s no way a divorcing couple could ever agree. Hence, there’s often an assumption that divorces where alimony is involved might not be good candidates for mediation or collaborative divorce. With the new alimony statutes in Massachusetts, where alimony terms are now more clearly… Read more »

Paying for college for divorcing parents

Paying for college can be quite a challenge for divorced parents. Yet those who have settled their divorce via mediation or collaborative divorce, might actually have an advantage in this area. How? Many couples—divorced and otherwise—have different ideas on whether to and how much to contribute to a child’s college education. Some think their child… Read more »